Health News


Most Medical Devices Approved for Kids Only Tested on Adults: Study

Apr 17, 2014

THURSDAY, April 17 (HealthDay News) -- Most medical devices approved for use in children are not tested on pediatric patients before they are marketed, a new Harvard study finds.

Since Congress passed the Pediatric Medical Device Safety and Improvement Act in 2007, which was designed to stimulate ...

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Salmonella decline seen in food poisoning report

Apr 17, 2014

By MIKE STOBBE, AP Medical Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — The government's latest report card on food poisoning is out, and it has some good news: a drop in illnesses from salmonella.

Last year, salmonella cases fell 9 percent, compared to the previous three years. The Centers for Disease Control and ...

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Off Season May Not Be Long Enough to Recover From Football 'Hits'

Apr 17, 2014

THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- New research shows that the brains of some football players who had the usual head hits associated with the sport, but no concussions, still had signs of mild brain injury six months after the season ended.

"We followed athletes at the beginning of ...

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Creative Pursuits Might Boost Your Job Performance

Apr 17, 2014

By Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Creative activities outside of work may help boost your job performance, a new study suggests.

Personal endeavors after-hours help employees recover from on-the-job demands and improve skills such as problem-solving,

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Health Highlights: April 17, 2014

Apr 17, 2014

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Scientists Create First Embryo Clones Using Cells From Adults

For the first time, scientists say they have used material from cells from two adults to create early stage cloned embryos. They then ...

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School Bans on Chocolate Milk May Backfire

Apr 17, 2014

By Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Banning chocolate milk from schools may sound like a good move for kids' health, but efforts to do so haven't turned out that way, a small study found.

Bans on chocolate milk in 11 Oregon elementary schools were linked ...

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Mouse Study Reveals New Secrets of Fertilization

Apr 17, 2014

THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists report they have demystified how a sperm and egg couple, with new research in mice indicating that egg cells carry a special receptor that allows sperm to attach to and fertilize eggs.

The British study, published online April 16 in the journal ...

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Bacteria May Survive Longer in Contact Lens Solution Than Thought

Apr 17, 2014

By Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Bacteria that can cause serious eye infections are able to survive longer in contact lens cleaning solution than previously known, a new study finds.

Researchers looked at different strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa,

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Scientists Find New Way to Observe 'Good' Brown Fat

Apr 17, 2014

By Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- In a possible advance for obesity research, an MRI scan has pinpointed "good" brown fat in a living adult for the first time.

The researchers say their success could help efforts to fight obesity and diabetes.

Unlike ...

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Portland Plans Reservoir Flush After Teen Cited for Urinating

Apr 17, 2014

By STEVEN DUBOIS, Associated Press

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Call it the Big Flush 2, and this time the sequel promises to be much bigger than the original.

Portland officials said Wednesday they are flushing away millions of gallons of treated water for the second time in less than three years ...

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Health Tip: Avoid Emotional Driving

Apr 17, 2014

By Diana Kohnle, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay News) -- Your emotions can hinder your ability to drive safely, so you should keep them in check while you're behind the wheel.

The Department of Motor Vehicles offers these suggestions:

  • If you feel angry, upset or annoyed, pull off the road and take a ...

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Health Tip: Avoid Diaper Rash

Apr 17, 2014

By Diana Kohnle, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay News) -- Diaper rash can be sore and painful for your little one, but there are things you can do to help keep diaper rash at bay.

The American Academy of Pediatrics says diaper rash can be triggered by:

  • Excessive moisture in or near the diaper.

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Misdiagnoses Common Among U.S. Outpatients: Review

Apr 17, 2014

By Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- At least 5 percent of American adults -- 12 million people -- are misdiagnosed in outpatient settings every year, and half of these errors could be harmful, a new study indicates.

The findings, from an analysis of ...

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Ebola virus in Africa outbreak is a new strain

Apr 16, 2014

By MARILYNN MARCHIONE, AP Chief Medical Writer

The Ebola virus that has killed scores of people in Guinea this year is a new strain — evidence that the disease did not spread there from outbreaks in some other African nations, scientists report.

"The source of the virus is still not known," but it ...

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Study: Diabetic heart attacks and strokes falling

Apr 16, 2014

By MIKE STOBBE, AP Medical Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — In the midst of the diabetes epidemic, a glimmer of good news: Heart attacks, strokes and other complications from the disease are plummeting.

Over the last two decades, the rates of heart attacks and strokes among diabetics fell by more than 60 ...

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Leeches Help Save Woman's Ear After Pit Bull Mauling

Apr 16, 2014

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A savage pit bull attack results in the total dismembering of a teenage girl's ear. And though the ear remains fully intact, complications during the initial reattachment process raise the real risk she could lose her ear forever.

What's a doctor to do?

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