Health News


Bacteria May Survive Longer in Contact Lens Solution Than Thought

Apr 17, 2014

By Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Bacteria that can cause serious eye infections are able to survive longer in contact lens cleaning solution than previously known, a new study finds.

Researchers looked at different strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa,

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Scientists Find New Way to Observe 'Good' Brown Fat

Apr 17, 2014

By Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- In a possible advance for obesity research, an MRI scan has pinpointed "good" brown fat in a living adult for the first time.

The researchers say their success could help efforts to fight obesity and diabetes.

Unlike ...

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Portland Plans Reservoir Flush After Teen Cited for Urinating

Apr 17, 2014

By STEVEN DUBOIS, Associated Press

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Call it the Big Flush 2, and this time the sequel promises to be much bigger than the original.

Portland officials said Wednesday they are flushing away millions of gallons of treated water for the second time in less than three years ...

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Health Tip: Avoid Emotional Driving

Apr 17, 2014

By Diana Kohnle, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay News) -- Your emotions can hinder your ability to drive safely, so you should keep them in check while you're behind the wheel.

The Department of Motor Vehicles offers these suggestions:

  • If you feel angry, upset or annoyed, pull off the road and take a ...

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Health Tip: Avoid Diaper Rash

Apr 17, 2014

By Diana Kohnle, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay News) -- Diaper rash can be sore and painful for your little one, but there are things you can do to help keep diaper rash at bay.

The American Academy of Pediatrics says diaper rash can be triggered by:

  • Excessive moisture in or near the diaper.

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Misdiagnoses Common Among U.S. Outpatients: Review

Apr 17, 2014

By Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- At least 5 percent of American adults -- 12 million people -- are misdiagnosed in outpatient settings every year, and half of these errors could be harmful, a new study indicates.

The findings, from an analysis of ...

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Ebola virus in Africa outbreak is a new strain

Apr 16, 2014

By MARILYNN MARCHIONE, AP Chief Medical Writer

The Ebola virus that has killed scores of people in Guinea this year is a new strain — evidence that the disease did not spread there from outbreaks in some other African nations, scientists report.

"The source of the virus is still not known," but it ...

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Study: Diabetic heart attacks and strokes falling

Apr 16, 2014

By MIKE STOBBE, AP Medical Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — In the midst of the diabetes epidemic, a glimmer of good news: Heart attacks, strokes and other complications from the disease are plummeting.

Over the last two decades, the rates of heart attacks and strokes among diabetics fell by more than 60 ...

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Leeches Help Save Woman's Ear After Pit Bull Mauling

Apr 16, 2014

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A savage pit bull attack results in the total dismembering of a teenage girl's ear. And though the ear remains fully intact, complications during the initial reattachment process raise the real risk she could lose her ear forever.

What's a doctor to do?

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Diabetes Complication Rates Drop Among U.S. Adults

Apr 16, 2014

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The rates of five serious complications from diabetes -- heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, amputations and death -- have all dropped dramatically since 1990, a new U.S. government study shows.

Heart attack rates have decreased nearly 70 percent in ...

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Chimps Prefer Firm 'Mattress'

Apr 16, 2014

By Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Like many people, chimpanzees are picky about their beds, a new study finds.

Specifically, these primate cousins prefer firm and stable types of wood to build beds or nests in trees, according to the study published ...

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Apathy Might Signal Brain Shrinkage in Old Age: Study

Apr 16, 2014

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults who show signs of apathy tend to have a smaller brain volume than their peers with more vim and vigor, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that of more than 4,300 older adults, those with at least two symptoms of apathy had slightly less ...

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Key Brain 'Networks' May Differ in Autism, Study Suggests

Apr 16, 2014

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Differences in brain connectivity may help explain the social impairments common in those who have autism spectrum disorders, new research suggests.

The small study compared the brains of 25 teens with an autism spectrum disorder to those of 25 ...

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Free Drug Samples for Doctors Might Prove Costly for Patients

Apr 16, 2014

By Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Dermatologists who receive free drug samples are more likely to give their patients prescriptions for expensive medicines, a new study says.

Researchers looked at data on prescriptions for adult acne medications ...

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Cancer 'Vaccine' for Advanced Disease Passes Early Hurdle

Apr 16, 2014

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers report early progress in developing a treatment that might one day help the immune system defend itself against cancer.

The results of their study -- the first of three stages of research required of drug treatments in the United States --

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Experimental Measles Drug Shows Promise in Animal Trials

Apr 16, 2014

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists have successfully tested in animals a new drug that might one day protect people infected with measles from getting sick, according to a new report.

"In people who are not vaccinated against measles due to health issues -- like severe ...

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Your 'Healthy' Bacteria Are as Individual as You Are

Apr 16, 2014

By Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to the communities of helpful bacteria living in and on people, "one-size-fits-all" is definitely not the rule, a new study finds.

A team at the University of Michigan found wide variation in the types ...

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Crunchy or Smooth? Food's Texture May Sway Perception of Calories

Apr 16, 2014

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Creamy butter or ice cream versus a crunchy granola bar: A new study suggests that the texture of foods influences people's dieting choices.

"We studied the link between how a food feels in your mouth and the amount we eat, the types of food we choose,

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