Health News


Health Tip: Work on Good Posture

May 7, 2012

(HealthDay News) -- If you have lower back pain, sitting at an office desk all day can aggravate your symptoms.

The University of Michigan Health System offers these suggestions for managing back pain at work:

  • Make sure your feet are flat on the floor, either by adjusting the seat or using a ...

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Health Tip: When Baby Has a Fever

May 7, 2012

(HealthDay News) -- When a baby has a fever, parents may be unsure if this warrants a call to the pediatrician.

The American Academy of Pediatricians offers these guidelines:

  • You must call your pediatrician immediately if your infant is age 2 months or younger, with a rectal temperature of 100.4 ...

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Birth Defect Rates Vary Depending on Fertility Treatment

May 7, 2012

By Steven Reinberg


HealthDay Reporter SATURDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Birth defects are more common after certain infertility treatments, but whether the cause is the assisted reproduction techniques themselves or the underlying biology preventing conception isn't clear, Australian researchers ...

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Living Alone with Alzheimer's Tough Choice for All

May 7, 2012

By LAURAN NEERGAARD, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — Elaine Vlieger is making some concessions to Alzheimer's. She's cut back on her driving, frozen dinners replace once elaborate cooking, and a son monitors her finances. But the Colorado woman lives alone and isn't ready to give up her house or ...

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Research May Point to New Obesity Treatments

May 6, 2012

SUNDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists who found a way to make white fat behave more like brown fat say their discovery could lead to new obesity treatments.

Brown fat burns energy (preventing obesity), while white fat stores energy (causing weight gain). White fat cells are associated with ...

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Living alone with Alzheimer's tough choice for all

May 6, 2012

By LAURAN NEERGAARD, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — Elaine Vlieger is making some concessions to Alzheimer's. She's cut back on her driving, frozen dinners replace once elaborate cooking, and a son monitors her finances. But the Colorado woman lives alone and isn't ready to give up her house ...

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Study ties fertility treatment, birth defect risk

May 5, 2012

By MARILYNN MARCHIONE, Associated Press

Test-tube babies have higher rates of birth defects, and doctors have long wondered: Is it because of certain fertility treatments or infertility itself? A large new study from Australia suggests both may play a role.

Compared to those conceived naturally,

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City Bike-Share Riders Seldom Wear Helmets

May 5, 2012

SATURDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Four out of five Americans who participate in public bike-sharing programs don't wear helmets and are putting themselves at significant risk for head injuries, a new study shows.

In bike-sharing programs, riders rent bikes from kiosks located throughout a city.

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Salmonella in dog food sickens 14 people across US

May 4, 2012

By HEATHER HOLLINGSWORTH and JEFFREY COLLINS, Associated Press

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Federal health officials say at least 14 people in nine states have been infected with salmonella by handling tainted dog food.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said no deaths have been reported,

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Judge: Texas can't cut funds to Planned Parenthood

May 4, 2012

By CHRIS TOMLINSON, Associated Press

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — A federal appeals court ruled Friday that Texas cannot ban Planned Parenthood from receiving state funds, at least until a lower court has a chance to hear formal arguments.

A three-judge panel of the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals agreed ...

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What killed Lenin? Stress didn't help, poison eyed

May 4, 2012

By ALEX DOMINGUEZ, Associated Press

BALTIMORE (AP) — Stress, family medical history or possibly even poison led to the death of Vladimir Lenin, contradicting a popular theory that a sexually transmitted disease debilitated the former Soviet Union leader, a UCLA neurologist said Friday.

Dr. Harry ...

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Obese Drivers Less Likely to Buckle Up: Study

May 4, 2012

FRIDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Obese drivers are less likely than normal-weight drivers to use their seat belts, a new study shows.

Researchers from the University at Buffalo, in New York, analyzed U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration data and found that normal-weight drivers ...

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More College-Educated Women Having Children

May 4, 2012

FRIDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- An increasing number of college-educated American women in their late 30s and 40s are having children, a new study shows.

The findings may represent a turnaround from previous decades, when the trend was for college-educated women to have fewer children, the ...

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Psychiatric Patients Often Wait Nearly 12 Hours in ER

May 4, 2012

FRIDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with mental health emergencies wait an average of 11.5 hours -- nearly half a day -- in hospital emergency departments, and those who are older, uninsured or intoxicated wait even longer, a new study says.

Overall, patients with psychiatric emergencies ...

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Men's Breast Cancer Often More Deadly, Study Suggests

May 4, 2012

By Kathleen Doheny
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer in men is much less common than it is in women, but it may be more deadly, new research suggests.

"Men with breast cancer don't do as well as women with breast cancer, and there are opportunities to improve that,"

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Mammograms Beat Thermography for Breast Cancer Detection: Study

May 4, 2012

By Kathleen Doheny
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Thermography -- a breast cancer detection method touted by some as a substitute for mammography -- is an unreliable cancer screen, according to new research.

In a study of about 180 women, thermography missed about 50 percent of ...

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Breast cancer is rare in men, but they fare worse

May 4, 2012

By LINDSEY TANNER, Associated Press

CHICAGO (AP) — Men rarely get breast cancer, but those who do often don't survive as long as women, largely because they don't even realize they can get it and are slow to recognize the warning signs, researchers say.

On average, women with breast cancer lived ...

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Attitude May Be Key to Overweight Girls' Risk of Depression

May 4, 2012

FRIDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight teen girls who are happy with their size and shape have higher levels of self-esteem, are less likely to be depressed and are less prone to unhealthy behaviors than those who don't like their bodies, researchers say.

For their study, University of ...

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Rising Obesity Rates Might Mean More Rheumatoid Arthritis

May 4, 2012

By Ellin Holohan
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- A new study suggests that severe weight gain might raise the risk for rheumatoid arthritis -- a painful, chronic ailment -- especially among obese women.

The epidemiological research indicated that about half of the increase in ...

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