Plastics Chemicals Tied to Reproductive Woes for Both Sexes

Early studies found higher miscarriage rates in women, lowered fertility in men

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Industry spokeswoman St. John said the studies should not cause any alarm.

"It is important to note that both of the studies rely on analysis of single-spot samples of blood or urine to measure BPA exposure," she said. "Studies of this type have essentially no capability to establish a cause-effect relationship since BPA has only a very short half-life in the body and, as a result, levels in blood or urine will have very high variability even within a day."

She added that public health officials continue to take a long, hard look at the safety of these chemicals and so far have not sounded any warning bells.

"The weight of scientific evidence on BPA has been extensively evaluated by government and scientific bodies around the world, which have declared the chemical safe as used in food contact," St. John said. "As recently as June of 2013, [the U.S. Food and Drug Administration] updated its perspective on BPA, stating that BPA is safe at the very low levels that occur in some foods and the use of BPA in food packaging and containers is safe."

Because they were presented at a medical meeting, the data and conclusions should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

For more about bisphenol A, visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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