Researchers Test Implanted Brain Stimulator for Alzheimer's

They hope the device will restore some thinking ability and improve focus, attention

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Jester said while he appreciates the opportunity for Kathy to participate in the study, it has been time consuming and sometimes disappointing as the physicians adjust and readjust pacemaker settings. "The doctors assure us that [her settings] are on the best place possible and we need patience as she goes forward from here."

As for other potential downsides to participating in the research, the two patients who have had the pacemakers and battery packs surgically placed have had no complications, according to Scharre. Should they have any problems associated with the actual stimulation, it's easy to just turn it off, he noted.

Experts encouraged caution at this point in the study.

"This is interesting but preliminary research," said Maria Carrillo, vice president of medical and scientific relations at the Alzheimer's Association. But it is good to see alternative treatment methods for Alzheimer's are being tested, she added.

More information

Learn how to create a plan to deal with Alzheimer's from the Alzheimer's Association.

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