Black Children Less Likely to Get Antibiotics: Study

Experts suspect the difference may stem from over-treatment in white children

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Both Samuels and Bartlett said that black parents probably don't need to be concerned by these findings. But, Bartlett added that all parents should "be strong advocates for their children. We're very fortunate that we have antibiotics to help when we need them, but there are a lot of times we don't need them, and we need to give a child's body time to heal on its own."

It's OK to ask your child's doctor why he or she is prescribing an antibiotic, or why not, according to Samuels.

"Physicians are your partners," said Samuels. "They're healers and teachers, and parents need to understand the thinking behind a clinical decision. Parents also need to know that every medication can potentially cause an allergic reaction and every medication can have adverse effects. Antibiotics need to be prescribed with great care and thought," she said.

More information

Learn more about appropriate antibiotic use from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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