1 in 8 Adults May Have Sensitive Teeth

Survey of U.S. dentists finds rates highest among young adults and women.

A new survey of U.S. dental offices finds that one in eight people has over-sensitive teeth.

A new survey of U.S. dental offices finds that one in eight people has over-sensitive teeth.

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Cunha-Cruz noted that "the important thing is to be aware that this might happen if you whiten your teeth." But, she added, "if you stop the treatment, it will usually go away."

Contrary to the view held by many dentists, the study did not find that people who were aggressive tooth brushers were more likely to experience sensitive teeth, Cunha-Cruz said.

Still, Trushkowsky recommends that "brushing with a soft brush and not using it horizontally, like a weed whacker," could help reduce your risk of developing sensitive teeth.

In addition, drinking water immediately after having acidic food or drink, such as fruit, orange juice, wine or coffee, and avoiding brushing for 10 or 15 minutes could help prevent sensitive teeth, Trushkowsky said.

Wearing a mouth guard at night if you grind your teeth could also help prevent wearing down the enamel that can lead to sensitive teeth, Trushkowsky suggested.

For her part, Rothen said sensitive teeth is a "significant problem because it is difficult to treat and we do not have a good treatment for it."

Over-the-counter toothpastes for sensitive teeth, such as Sensodyne and Colgate's Sensitive Pro-Relief, can sometimes help treat the condition, Trushkowsky said.

If patients do not get relief from special toothpastes, more invasive treatments include fillings, a bonding agent to seal the tooth, or grafting new gum tissue in the case of receding gums, he said.

More information

Learn more about dental health at the American Dental Association.

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