Saving Carbs for Dinnertime Might Help Control Weight

Experimental diet offered benefits in small study, but experts say it's too soon to say it works

Israeli researchers found in a small study that saving most carbohydrates for dinnertime may help keep people from feeling hungry the following day.

Israeli researchers found in a small study that saving most carbohydrates for dinnertime may help keep people from feeling hungry the following day.

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Jamieson-Petonic also questioned whether the lab data for the research was complete enough to make a reliable conclusion. Of the 63 participants, lab results were reported for only 39 individuals.

For most people, the toughest issue in dieting is maintaining weight loss over time. Jamieson-Petonic said the fact that the data for this study was reported after just six months fails to prove the diet is effective. "The challenge is keeping the weight off," she said. "I'd love to see these people one year out, or 18 months out. That's the challenge my clients have. And I'd also like to see the lab values after a year."

For her part, Diekman said it's clearly too soon for people to switch to a dinnertime carbohydrate diet. "From my perspective, measuring calories in and calories expended gives most people the most benefit based on what we know now."

More information

To learn more about healthy eating, visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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