Could Kids' Salt Intake Affect Their Weight?

Study found those who consumed more sodium also drank more sugary beverages.

This photo illustration shows a salt shaker in a plate with a sandwich and potato chips in Miami on Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2012.
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"Really, the bottom line is that we need to make healthier diet choices overall," Sandon said.

Kristi King, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, agreed that overall diet and lifestyle are what matter.

"We can't necessarily say childhood obesity is salt's fault -- or sugar-sweetened beverages' fault," said King, senior dietician at Texas Children's Hospital in Houston.

But, she added, the study is a "great wake-up call" for parents to take a look at their children's, and their own, eating habits.

"Children learn by example, so if high-sodium foods and sugar-sweetened beverages are readily available in the house and consumed by the parents on a regular basis, [kids] are going to be more likely to consume those as well," King said.

More information

Learn ways to cut down on sodium from the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

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