Survival After General Anesthesia Vastly Improved: Study

However, the trend is seen mostly in developed countries, researcher says

The number of people who survive surgery when general anesthesia is used has improved, particularly in developing countries.

The number of people who survive surgery when general anesthesia is used has improved, particularly in developing countries.

HealthDay SHARE

"Of the 200 million catheters estimated to be inserted each year in the U.S.A. alone, if even 15 percent are needed for more than three days, then a change to clinically required replacement would prevent up to 6 million unnecessary intravenous catheter insertions, and would save about 2 million hours of staff time, and up to US$60 million in health costs each year for that country alone," lead researcher Claire Rickard, from Griffith University in Australia, said in a journal news release.

More information

For more on surgery safety, visit the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.