20% of U.S. Women Uninsured in 2010, Up From 15% in 2000: Report

While study authors say Affordable Care Act should fix many problems, not everyone agrees

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Because not all states are going to increase Medicaid benefits as outlined in the law, there will still be gaps in coverage for women on Medicaid in some states, he added.

The new report is not without critics.

They include Greg Scandlen, director of the Health Benefits Group Inc., which offers health insurance and life insurance to individuals and groups. "This report is a wonderful example of how you can prove anything if you cherry-pick the data carefully enough," he said.

Women aren't disadvantaged when it comes to health insurance, Scandlen said, adding, "In fact, women are far more likely to be covered than are men at nearly every age."

There are sex-based differences in all insurance markets, Scandlen said. "Women pay more for health insurance than men because they consume far more services than men. In the life and auto insurance markets, women pay far less than men because they drive safer and live longer," he said.

By looking at health care in other countries, Scandlen said, the report didn't take into account long wait times for care and the rationing of care in other nations.

"The Affordable Care Act may very well remove price obstacles to care, although that remains to be seen," he said. "But if it floods the system with new patients without increasing the supply of providers, it may result in less actual care for everyone."

More information

For more on the Affordable Care Act, visit HealthCare.gov.

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