Green Tea May Lower Lung Cancer Risk

Benefits seen for smokers, nonsmokers, those with certain genetic makeup

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Their findings were published online Jan. 12 in Cancer Research.

Exploring yet another front in lung cancer science, a second study scheduled for release at the lung cancer conference suggests that lung cancer patients who are smokers seem better able than nonsmoking patients to tolerate higher -- and presumably more effective -- dosages of a standard chemotherapy treatment known as erlotinib.

The research team, from the Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, N.C., found that while nonsmokers ultimately developed dangerously toxic side effects -- such as rashes, diarrhea and/or dehydration -- when placed on an average daily dose regimen of just 225 milligrams of erlotinib, smokers didn't develop similarly problematic reactions until the daily average dosage reached 300 milligrams.

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For additional details on green tea and lung cancer prevention, visit the National Cancer Institute.

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