New Diagnostic Guidelines for Mental Illnesses Proposed

Suggested changes include not formally recognizing sex addiction, spotting those at risk for dementia

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"Every time the DSM is revised it gets bigger and there seem to be more and more disorders, and new ones seem to be invented," said James Maddux, a professor of psychology at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va. "There has been a gradual psychopathologizing of everyday problems in living."

The DSM-5, however, might escape such criticisms, Maddux conceded.

"Any movement towards a dimensional model is a move in the direction of being consistent with the research," he said. "Any change that reduces the probability that someone with a normal, expected problem in living is going to be said to have a mental disorder is also a move in the right direction."

More information

View and comment on the proposed changes by visiting the American Psychiatric Association.

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