10 Ways to Get Your Omega-3s Without a Pill

Omega-3 supplements are everywhere, but do you really need one?

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For those who prefer to go the dietary route, there are quite a few options. Fatty fish are certainly ideal for getting EPA and DHA omega-3s, but plant sources can help boost your omega-3 intake in the form of ALA. Here are some ways the American Heart Association suggests getting your omega-3s without taking a pill.

Tuna. Bluefin tuna is particularly high in EPA and DHA omega-3s, but the American Heart Association recommends albacore, too.

Salmon. Atlantic wild packs the most significant EPA-DHA wallop of the salmons, according to the Agricultural Research Service of the Department of Agriculture.

Mackerel. Mackerel meat is often very oily, providing a good helping of EPA and DHA per serving.

Trout. Wild rainbow trout has one of the highest concentrations of EPA and DHA per serving, according to the Agricultural Research Service.

Herring. This small oily fish has been a staple in Nordic countries. Pickled, marinated, smoked, or otherwise prepared, it offers a generous helping of EPA and DHA. 

Sardines. Though a turnoff to some, these oily fish—along with cousin anchovy—can have a significant amount of omega-3.

Soybeans. Get yours in the form or tofu and edamame, the Japanese appetizer, for a dose of ALA, a plant form of omega-3.

Walnuts. Nuts, in general, offer healthful benefits to one’s diet. The walnut offers an especially large helping of omega-3 in the form of ALA.

Flaxseeds. Get ground flaxseed to sprinkle on cereal, or use flaxseed oil in salad dressings to incorporate this ALA-rich seed.

Canola oil. Used as a cooking oil in place of other vegetable oils, canola can increase one's dose of ALA omega-3s.