Intravenous Vitamin C May Boost Chemo's Cancer-Fighting Power

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"You have to do a bigger study with patients and look at outcomes. You also have to make sure these treatments don't interfere with the treatments we're giving currently," she said. "There may be some efficacy in what they're doing. It just needs to be proven. This is just the start of more studies looking at this in-depth."

Dr. Michael Seiden, chief medical officer for The US Oncology Network, agreed.

"It is important to emphasize that many vitamin therapies have shown interesting results when applied to cancer cells in test tubes yet, to date, these approaches typically are not effective and occasionally prove harmful in human studies," he said. "At this time, there is still no evidence that high-dose vitamin C should be part of the treatment for women with ovarian cancer."

While she agreed that larger trials need to be conducted, Drisko was not as hesitant.

"It's safe. It's inexpensive. There's a plausible mechanism we're investigating for why it works," she said. "We should be using this in patients, rather than dragging our feet and worrying about using it at all."

More information

Visit the U.S. National Cancer Institute for more on vitamin C and cancer.

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